Stock photo: Field of barley

Field Of Barley

Image ID: 150487 | Add to lightbox | View image license
Screen sizePrint sizeFile size
1704 x 2272 pixels5.7" x 7.6" at 300dpi
14.5cm x 19.3cm at 300dpi
1390 Kbytes
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Photo details
»  Field of barley
It's another of my series 'A lot of barley'
»  Uploaded by
dermiller (||)
on Jun 18, 2004
»  Downloads
1590
»  Usage
Royalty free, see usage options
»  Model release
unavailable

EXIF Data

» Camera: Canon DIGITAL IXUS 400
» Exp. time: 1/500 (0.002 secs)
» Aperture: f/2.8
» Focal length: 7 mm

Categories

» Nature / Plants

Comments

7. Apr 14, 2010 ltpgo
"got a new blog about golfing. I will download this amazing image for future use. Will notify you again ... cheers http://www.learntopl- aygolfonline.com"

6. Oct 17, 2007 ilauwira06
"hi i might use it for print ad. thks"

5. Mar 3, 2007 visten
"Very nice picture! Used it on http://www.greendoma- ins.eu/organic-cerea- ls-and-flour-product- s.html . It is a pity, but I had to cut it - needed square shape. Thank you so much for sharing!"

4. Apr 9, 2005 tlorien
"Amazing shot - wheat or barley! ;-)"

3. Jun 18, 2004 dermiller
"I've renamed all Pictures. Removed Corn, sets 'barley'. Translating sucks! ;-) For 'Getreide' are 8 words in dictonary. For 'Gerste' only one -> 'barley'"

2. Jun 18, 2004 knips
"... and what you see here with the long beards, that swing so wonderfully in the wind, is neither corn nor wheat, but barley. It is not for baking bread, but mainly used for making beer."

1. Jun 18, 2004 mexikids
""corn" is what it's called in deutschland, but "wheat" in U.S. English.
i had the privelege to be in Germany when i was 15 and an elderly lady explained to me that after W.W.II, there was a scarcity of food and the German people asked the Allied forces for "corn" to make bread. The Brits and Americans didn't know it had a different meaning in Germany and send over "corn" (maize; big kernal on a cob) and the folks receiving the stuff in Germany had no idea what to do with this odd, unfamiliar grain. The lady told me they thought the Americans were giving them cattle feed or were just being difficult. It was over a decade later before someone explained to here the "false cognate" that caused the confusion."


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